May was a busy month for Send Anywhere as we were also written about by Jon Russel (@jonrussel) on The Next Web. Below we’ve placed some exerts from the article with the full article being available here.

Jon starts the article off by talking about what Send Anywhere brings to the table:

Send Anywhere is a different take on file-sharing for those who are looking for added security. The service takes cues from ephemeral services like Snapchat: each shared link is only available for 10 minutes before it self-destructs.

He also touches on the simplicity and security of the application:

The site doesn’t ask for any details of either the sender or recipient, leaving you to either send the alphanumeric code or QR code to the person who will receive your document once they enter the details. Furthermore, ESTmob, the company behind Send Anywhere, says that its service never stores files on its servers, making it even more secure.

And finishes the article with a nice pitch about the benefits of Send Anywhere versus other similar vendors:

So, if rumors about backdoor access to Dropbox, its file-share bugs, or general concerns about Google Drive or other services worry you, then Send Anywhere might be an interesting option for moving documents across your devices, or to friends, family and colleagues.

Thanks for the article, Jon!